Working in isolation facilities can be draining and stressful, psychologist says

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A psychologist says defence force personnel are probably struggling with the mental strain of working in isolation facilities, for the same reasons health workers do.

Doctor using stethoscope to checking Asian senior or elderly old lady woman patient wearing a face mask in hospital for protect infection Covid-19 Coronavirus.

A psychologist said medical professionals have talked to her about the stress of possibly passing on the virus to family members.
Photo: 123RF

Yesterday RNZ reported that about 10 percent of the nearly 2000 defence force staff surveyed by the military after working at managed isolation and quarantine facilities, required a check by a psychologist.

Psychologist Corina Grennell said medical professionals have talked to her about the stress of possibly passing on the virus to family members, and she believes this would also be a worry for those in the defence force working at the facilities.

She said being hypervigilant – having to stay on high alert all the time – is incredibly draining.

Grennell said being away from friends and family for extended periods can also be stressful.

The Defence Force survey showed that out of 1718 personnel who had or currently worked within Managed Isolation and Quarantine Facilities, 246 of them said they had seen something that required a check in with the Defence Force psychology team, and another 22 asked for a psychologist’s help.

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